A Heavenly Experiment

Humans, angels, and a battle to get back home to Heaven hinging on a 4 year old girl who’s the product of a human and an angel is the centerpiece of Heaven’s Forgotten by Branden Johnson.

The fallen angel Michael is on a mission to kill the woman he was with in Chicago before his fall, Maria–or as she’s now known, Moira. Moira and her daughter Penelope flee their home in North Carolina to evade a threat coming their way, as forewarned through TV static to Penelope. Drawing in friend and child psychologist Jake, who is part of Moira and Penelope’s new life, and Adam, who is part of Maria’s life in Chicago and her closest friend who knew all about her angelic visits, Moira struggles to keep her daughter out of Michael’s deadly hands, as well as the hands of a fallen angel, calling himself Semyaza, trying to get back to Heaven. What sacrifices will need to be made in order to assure Penelope’s safety and are people ready to make them?

This narrative was an interesting, and not overly done, take on interactions between angels and humans. Most stories along these lines harp upon the romantic aspect, but this narrative is more about action and survival than it is about the love stories driving people’s actions, which was a nice relief. There were a few instances throughout the text where it seemed like dialogue would take place between characters where a significant progression would occur without much natural evolution in the discussion and caused confusion for me as the jump seemed to rely on information that the characters had that the reader didn’t, yet seemed to assume the reader also knew. As story tropes tend to be formulaic and, therefore, predictable, there were many character interactions that could be easily guessed by seasoned readers, yet the writing helps to take you along for the ride regardless.

Overall, I’d give it a 3.5 out of 5 stars.

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