Death Defying

27274346

When it comes to life and death, not many people get second chances, but for two people in The Ferryman Institute by Colin Gigl, their second chance is intertwined.

Charlie Dawson is a Ferryman, a kinder version of a grim reaper who helps people move on to their afterlife. Having spent 250 years successfully ferrying all of his assignments, even the most difficult, his legendary status as a Ferryman weighs heavily on his psyche. Having repeatedly applied to leave the Ferryman Institute and been denied, Charlie has finally been offered an opportunity to do something other than lose his mind and watch as people die. When given the secret presidential assignment for Alice Spiegel’s suicide, Charlie’s instructions offer him a choice to either let her die or save her. Stunned by the 30 seconds he’s given to choose, Charlie opts to save her, staring a domino of upheaval within the Ferryman Institute that’s fighting against Charlie saving Alice.

Incorporating Greek mythology that involves death and the underworld, the narrative is familiar but with some of its own unique additions, such as the door to the afterlife and a universal Ferryman’s key to unlock travel to any place in the world. The story was rather enjoyable, particularly all the sarcastic and witty comments that Charlie and Alice levied against one another and others. The ending was a little too clichéd for my preferences with the character reveals and the epilogue material, but did develop in a convincing manner so I can’t be too upset with it.

Overall, I’d give it a 4 out of 5 stars.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s